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'Alouette'
Song
LanguageFrench
WrittenUnknown
GenreFolk
Songwriter(s)Traditional
Audio sample

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'Alouette' (pronounced [alwɛt]) is a popular French-language Canadian[1] children's song, commonly thought to be about plucking the feathers from a lark. Although it is in French, it is well known among speakers of other languages; in this respect it is similar to 'Frère Jacques'. Many US Marines and other Allied soldiers learned the song while serving in France during World War I and took it home with them, passing it on to their children and grandchildren.[2][3]

History[edit]

The song's origin is uncertain, though the most popular theory is that it is French-Canadian. It was first published in A Pocket Song Book for the Use of Students and Graduates of McGill College (Montreal, 1879). Canadian folklorist Marius Barbeau was of the opinion that the song's origin was France, though the first printed copy in France came 14 years after the original Canadian (McGill) publication.[1]

The Canadian theory is based on the French fur trade that was active for over 300 years in North America. Canoes were used to transport trade goods in exchange for furs through established expansive trade routes consisting of interconnecting lakes, and rivers, and portages in the hinterland of present-day Canada and United States. The songs of the French fur trade were adapted to accompany the motion of paddles dipped in unison. Singing helped to pass the time and made the work seem lighter. In fact, it is likely that the Montreal Agents and Wintering Partners (precursor to the North West Company of fur traders) sought out and preferred to hire voyageurs who liked to sing and were good at it. They believed that singing helped the voyageurs to paddle faster and longer. French colonists ate horned larks, which they considered a game bird. 'Alouette' informs the lark that the singer will pluck its head, nose, eyes, wings and tail. En roulant ma boule sings of ponds, bonnie ducks and a prince on hunting bound. Many of the songs favored by the voyageurs have been passed down to our own era.

'Alouette' has become a symbol of French Canada for the world, an unofficial national song.[1] Today, the song is used to teach French- and English-speaking children in Canada, and others learning French around the world, the names of body parts. Singers will point to or touch the part of their body that corresponds to the word being sung in the song.

Ethnomusicologist Conrad LaForte points out that, in song, the lark (l'alouette) is the bird of the morning, and that it is the first bird to sing in the morning, hence waking up lovers and causing them to part, and waking up others as well, something that is not always appreciated. In French songs, the lark also has the reputation of being a gossip, a know-it-all, and cannot be relied on to carry a message, as it will tell everyone; it also carries bad news. However the nightingale, being the first bird of spring, in Europe, sings happily all the time, during the lovely seasons of spring and summer. The nightingale (i.e., rossignol) also carries messages faithfully and dispenses advice, in Latin, no less, a language that lovers understand. LaForte explains that this alludes to the Middle Ages, when only a select few still understood Latin.[4] And so, as the lark makes lovers part or wakes up the sleepyhead, this would explain why the singer of 'Alouette' wants to pluck it in so many ways if he can catch it, for, as LaForte notes, this bird is flighty as well.

The lark was eaten in Europe, and when eaten was known as a 'mauviette', which is also a term for a sickly person.[5]

Structure[edit]

'Alouette' usually involves audience participation, with the audience echoing every line of each verse after the verse's second line. It is a cumulative song, with each verse built on top of the previous verses, much like the Englishcarol 'The Twelve Days of Christmas'.

Lyrics[edit]

Below are the original French lyrics along with a literal English translation.

FrenchEnglish translation
Refrain
Alouette, gentille alouette,
Alouette, je te plumerai.

1.

Je te plumerai la tête. ×2
Et la tête! ×2
Alouette! ×2
A-a-a-ah
Refrain

2.

Je te plumerai le bec. ×2
Et le bec! ×2
Et la tête! ×2
Alouette! ×2
A-a-a-ah
Refrain

3.

Je te plumerai les yeux. ×2
Et les yeux! ×2
Et le bec! ×2
Et la tête! ×2
Alouette! ×2
A-a-a-ah
Refrain

4.

Je te plumerai le cou. ×2
Et le cou! ×2
Et les yeux! ×2
Et le bec! ×2
Et la tête! ×2
Alouette! ×2
A-a-a-ah
Refrain

5.

Je te plumerai les ailes. ×2
Et les ailes! ×2
Et le cou! ×2
Et les yeux! ×2
Et le bec! ×2
Et la tête! ×2
Alouette! ×2
A-a-a-ah
Refrain

6.

Je te plumerai les pattes. ×2
Et les pattes! ×2
Et les ailes! ×2
Et le cou! ×2
Et les yeux! ×2
Et le bec! ×2
Et la tête! ×2
Alouette! ×2
A-a-a-ah
Refrain

7.

Je te plumerai la queue. ×2
Et la queue! ×2
Et les pattes! ×2
Et les ailes! ×2
Et le cou! ×2
Et les yeux! ×2
Et le bec! ×2
Et la tête! ×2
Alouette! ×2
A-a-a-ah
Refrain

8.

Je te plumerai le dos. ×2
Et le dos! ×2
Et la queue! ×2
Et les pattes! ×2
Et les ailes! ×2
Et le cou! ×2
Et les yeux! ×2
Et le bec! ×2
Et la tête! ×2
Alouette! ×2
A-a-a-ah
Refrain
Refrain
Lark, nice lark,
Lark, I will pluck you.

1.

I will pluck your head. ×2
And your head! ×2
Lark! ×2
O-o-o-oh
Refrain

2.

I will pluck your beak. ×2
And your beak! ×2
And your head! ×2
Lark! ×2
O-o-o-oh
Refrain

3.

I will pluck your eyes. ×2
And your eyes! ×2
And your beak! ×2
And your head! ×2
Lark! ×2
O-o-o-oh
Refrain

4.

I will pluck your neck. ×2
And your neck! ×2
And your eyes! ×2
And your beak! ×2
And your head! ×2
Lark! ×2
O-o-o-oh
Refrain

5.

I will pluck your wings. ×2
And your wings! ×2
And your neck! ×2
And your eyes! ×2
And your beak! ×2
And your head! ×2
Lark! ×2
O-o-o-oh
Refrain

6.

I will pluck your legs. ×2
And your legs! ×2
And your wings! ×2
And your neck! ×2
And your eyes! ×2
And your beak! ×2
And your head! ×2
Lark! ×2
O-o-o-oh
Refrain

7.

I will pluck your tail. ×2
And your tail! ×2
And your legs! ×2
And your wings! ×2
And your neck! ×2
And your eyes! ×2
And your beak! ×2
And your head! ×2
Lark! ×2
O-o-o-oh
Refrain

8.

I will pluck your back. ×2
And your back! ×2
And your tail! ×2
And your legs! ×2
And your wings! ×2
And your neck! ×2
And your eyes! ×2
And your beak! ×2
And your head! ×2
Lark! ×2
O-o-o-oh
Refrain

Adaptations[edit]

An English song known as 'If You Love Me' uses the same tune as 'Alouette'.

The English composer Benjamin Britten adapted the tune for part of his 1939 orchestral composition Canadian Carnival.

The tune of the chorus has been adapted to make the tune of the children's song 'Down by the Station'.

The song was used for a paper cut-out-animated film directed by Norman McLaren.

The song was used by French-Canadian nuns in the United States to help teach French to their students. They substituted the French word for human body parts for the bird parts.

An instrumental version was recorded on March 20, 1962, as one of the songs on the Pete and Conte Candoli jazz album There Is Nothing Like a Dame, featuring the Candoli brothers on trumpets, Shelly Manne on drums, Jimmy Rowles on piano, Howard Roberts on guitar and Gary Peacock on bass.

The tune was recomposed into a musical lesson on being a ghost, titled, appropriately, Ghost Lesson and sung by Casper and others on the record Casper - A Trip Through Ghostland.

The melody for the sung parts of 'Little Bunny Foo Foo' is taken from 'Alouette'.

In popular culture[edit]

  • Pablo Picasso sings it in The Adventures of Picasso
  • In Season 2, episode 21 of Dance Moms, the group dance was based on the song.
  • The Montreal Alouettes of the Canadian Football League (CFL) are named after the song itself.
  • As this song is not under copyright, its music is frequently used in cartoons. For example, the two chefs in the classic 1951 Bugs Bunny short French Rarebit sing 'Alouette' while inside an oven, Pepé Le Pew sings it twice in Touché and Go (1957) and it's heard again at the very end of the short, and Nibbles sings it in the 1952 Tom and Jerry short, The Two Mouseketeers. It is also used as a leitmotif for appearances of the character Fifi La Fume on the animated television series Tiny Toon Adventures (1990–1992).
  • On the Alvin and the Chipmunks 1961 album The Alvin Show, they perform the song with Alvin going very loud and high on the 'OHHH' and Dave admonishing him 'Alvin...' and then Alvin goes low and out. When Dave says he can't understand what they are saying and asks them can they sing it in English, they respond with a few verses of 'If You Love Me'.
  • In the television sitcom Gilligan's Island, when Mr. and Mrs. Howell have a fight in the season 1 episode 'The Matchmaker' (1965), the other castaways try to recreate the French restaurant where they met. Ginger Grant does her part by singing a slow, passionate version of the song for the couple, ostensibly to create a 'romantic mood' – humorously offset for the viewing audience by the less than romantic nature of the lyrics.
  • In the television sitcom Hogan's Heroes, Corporal Louis LeBeau sings the song for an audience of German guards in the season 2 episode titled 'Praise the Fuhrer and Pass the Ammunition' (1967).
  • In the television sitcom Get Smart, the season 3 episode 'The Hot Line' (1968) features the Chief singing 'Alouette' with the lyrics altered to code words to warn Smart and 99 that they are in danger.
  • In the television comedy/drama M*A*S*H, Colonel Potter greets a Canadian officer over the radio with 'A jaunty Alouetter to ya!'
  • In the television sitcom 'Liv And Maddie', the season 3 episode 'Vive-La-Rooney' (2016) features Karen singing the song to Liv so she can unlock her inner French and answer questions for a French interview.
  • The song is also used for parody and cultural reference. Comedian and performer Andy Kaufman used to sing his own derivative of 'Alouette' titled 'Abodabee', which he claimed was a song 'performed every harvest time in the islands of the Caspian Sea'.
  • In the one of the song albums from the popular show, Dora the Explorer, Dora and her backpack performed this song when they arrived in France. It was performed by Kathleen Herles (Dora Márquez) Sasha Toro-Murillo (Backpack)
  • On Koffi Olomide's 2001 album Effrakata, his song 'R.A.S Rien à Signaler' uses a sample of the song towards the end.
  • In François Bourgeon's first issue of the comic book series The Companions of the Dusk (1983), a group of Breton villagers sing the song as they merrily prepare to torture and kill a suspected witch.
  • In the television series Mr. Bean: The Animated Series, the season 3 episode 'Art Thief' (2003) features an instrumental version of the song when Mr. Bean travels to Paris.
  • In the animated series Phineas and Ferb, the season 3 episode 'Buford Confidential' (2012) has three Fireside Girls from France singing the song.
  • In the classic western “Bonanza”, Season 5; Ep. 18 “Gentleman from New Orleans” John Dehner plays a man posing as Jean Lafite. He sings the song and dances vigorously in the local saloon to the delight of the pub's patrons.
  • In the animated series Adventure Time, the season 3 episode 'Holly Jolly Secrets' (2011), ends part 1 with Jake screaming after seeing that Ice King found them watching his secret tapes, then part 2 starts with Jake still screaming, and then he suddenly breaks into 'Alouette'.
  • An episode of the Canadian sketch comedy show The Kids in the Hall featured a sketch where a pair of French-Canadian trappers (Kevin McDonald and Dave Foley) sang the song while canoeing in an office and taking 'coats' (the jackets of businessmen).
  • The song is the basis for Mark Ronson's 2010 song 'Bang Bang Bang'.
  • The song is used in the season 4 episode 'Delusions of Grandview' in the television series Ghost Whisperer (2005–2010).
  • In television's Beetlejuice: The Animated Series (1989–1991), the character Jacques Left Feet is often seen jogging while singing 'Alouette, jogging alouette...'.
  • In the Season 2 Sonic the Hedgehog episode, The Odd Couple, Antoine briefly sings this song (presumably to emphasize his being French).
  • In Salman Rushdie's 2005 novel Shalimar the Clown, after the ambassador Max Ophuls is murdered outside his daughter's doorstep, his daughter India recalls singing this song with her father.[6]
  • In the Japanese television anime series Bobobo-bo Bo-bobo (2003–2005), King Nose Hair sings a part of the song during a flashback in an episode.[episode needed]
  • The song is heard in the 2016 film The Promise, when Anna tries to comfort orphans of the Armenian Genocide during the battle of Musa Dagh.
  • In 2006, the tune was used with new lyrics, in a song titled Dirty Monkey Mackem and attributed to the 'group' Septic Hank and the Magpie Cowboys, to promote the association football rivalry between closely located Newcastle United Magpies and the Sunderland Black Cats (the suggested Mackem-tongued monkeys).[7]
  • In The Wiggles' video Taking Off!, The Wiggles visit their friend Mimi who performs a ballet dance, joined at intervals by The Wiggles, to an instrumental version of the song.
  • In the 1967 France film production Les Amitiés Particulières, the song is heard during an ambiguous conversation between Georges and Lucien, then again during a dramatic moment in the train.
  • In the animated series The Simpsons, the season 4 episode 'Lisa's First Word' (1992) has Bart singing the song to Patty and Selma, though he only remembers the refrain.
  • In Dance Moms season 2 (2012) episode 21,'Break a leg', the song is used for a lyrical group dance.
  • In the 2019 BBC adaptation of Les Misérables, Cosette remarks that the guests at the Thénardiers' inn would often sing this to her, and she was nicknamed 'petite alouette'. She is later seen singing this to herself after she is rescued by Jean Valjean.
  • This song is performed in the 1999 Barney Home Video, What A World We Share.
  • The song is sampled in Cheryl Cole's 2010 hit single Promise This.

References[edit]

  1. ^ abcPlouffe, Hélène. ''Alouette!''. The Canadian Encyclopedia. Retrieved 13 January 2017.
  2. ^Conrad LaForte, Survivances médiévales dans la chanson folklorique, Université Laval Press, 1981
  3. ^Larousse gastronomique, Hamlyn, London, New York, Sydney, Toronto, 1974
  4. ^LaForte, Conrad (1981). Survivances médiévales dans la chanson folklorique: Poétique de la chanson en laisse (Ethnologie de l'Amérique française). Presses de l'Université Laval. pp. 227–229. ISBN978-2763769288.
  5. ^'Lark', Larousse Gastronomique, the encyclopedia of food, wine and cooking, Hamlyn: London, New York. Sydney, Toronto, 14th edition, 1974.
  6. ^Rushdie, Salman (2005). Shalimar the Clown. Random House. p. 41.
  7. ^Dirty Monkey Mackem. Septic Hank and the Magpie Cowboys. YouTube. 2007-03-06. Retrieved 2018-08-21.
Wordorama

External links[edit]

Retrieved from 'https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Alouette_(song)&oldid=1016865219'

The twenty-eighth U.S. president was a white supremacist. We all know this, in the abstract. But here’s how he wielded his racism against one accomplished Black American.

Library of Congress

Last week, Princeton University announced that it would remove Woodrow Wilson’s name from the School of Public and International Affairs because his “racist thinking and policies make him an inappropriate namesake for a school or college whose scholars, students, and alumni must stand firmly against racism in all its forms,” said the university’s president, Christopher L. Eisgruber. “Wilson’s racism was significant and consequential even by the standards of his own time.”

Donald Trump’s fulminations aside, it seems most people don’t care about Princeton’s gesture, especially if that’s the extent of our cultural reckoning with the former president. The move hasn’t been met with the same furor as, say, efforts in D.C. to remove a statue of Abraham Lincoln standing beside a kneeling freed slave: Even National Review, home of “The Cancel Counter,” refuses to rush to Wilson’s defense.

But this moment is a unique opportunity to learn about the Black Americans who suffered at Wilson’s malicious hand—to raise their names as we tear down his. So here’s a story about the intersecting lives of three men: the twenty-eighth president of the United States, the author whose book became the basis for D.W. Griffith’s Birth of a Nation, and the former slave who became a Civil War hero and one of the first Blacks to serve in Congress.

The legend of Robert Smalls begins on May 13, 1862. A 23-year-old slave, he worked as a sailor on The Planter, a 300-ton commercial steamship retrofitted as a Confederacy war vessel that was docked in the harbor of Charleston, South Carolina. Just before dawn, Smalls and his fellow enslaved workers seized the boat and, after stopping to pick up family members and other Black men and women involved in the plot, sailed out of the harbor past Confederate checkpoints. They then surrendered the ship to nearby Union forces, for which they were rewarded with money and freedom.

For the next three years, Smalls fought for the Union. When the war ended in 1865, he returned home to Beaufort, South Carolina. With his reward money, he bought the house that once belonged to the first two people to own him as a slave: his father and his half-brother. Except for brief periods, he would never leave. “I was born and raised in South Carolina,” he once said, “and today I live on the very spot on which I was born, and I expect to remain here as long as the Great God allows me to live.”

Smalls founded the South Carolina Republican Party in 1867 and, in 1868, joined 71 Black delegates to the state convention that ratified the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. In that same convention, Smalls and his fellow Black delegates adopted a progressive state constitution, providing for public education, abolishing race and property ownership as conditions for holding public office, and overturning Black Codes. He would live long enough to see his achievement dismantled in 1895, when whites regained power in South Carolina and adopted a Jim Crow Constitution. As one state newspaper put it at the time, “We can trust white men to do right by the inferior race, but we cannot trust the inferior race with power over the white man.” With some amendments, that constitution remains in effect to this day.

In the years in between, Smalls was first a state representative, then a state senator, and finally, between 1875 and 1887, a U.S. representative. He served in Congress alongside Richard Cain, the pastor of Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, where, in 2015, Dylann Roof murdered nine Black congregants. He represented the 7th congressional district, then the 5th district; once white Southern Democrats regained power, Smalls was the last Republican to represent the 5th for nearly 130 years, until 2011, when Mick Mulvaney, Donald Trump’s former chief of staff, won the seat as part of the Tea Party wave that rose in opposition to the election of the first Black president.

But it was while serving in the South Carolina legislature that Smalls first crossed paths, unbeknownst to him, with Tomas Dixon Jr. The latter was just eight years old when his uncle took him to observe the proceedings of the statehouse. Dixon would go on to author The Leopard’s Spots: A Romance of the White Man’s Burden, The Clansman: An Historical Romance of the Ku Klux Klan, and The Traitor: A Story of the Rise and Fall of the Invisible Empire. Dixon claimed that the memory of “ninety-four Negroes, seven native scalawags and twenty-three white men” debating affairs of state moved him to set the record straight on Reconstruction with his white supremacist trilogy.

Griffith’s movie, which drew heavily from The Clansman, opened on February 8, 1915; Smalls died two weeks later; it’s unlikely he ever saw it. The movie proved popular in part because Dixon enlisted the help of a powerful friend to promote it: President Woodrow Wilson, whom he’d met at Johns Hopkins University. Wilson screened the film in the White House and helped arrange a viewing for members of Congress and Supreme Court justices. When Black people urged a boycott of the film over its portrayal of newly freedmen as bloodthirsty savages, newspapers reported that the president himself had seen and liked the film.

Wilson promoted the film not just out of loyalty to his college friend but because Wilson himself was an avowed white supremacist who, even by the mores of his time, held Black people in the sort of racist contempt that even his gracious manners and urbane sophistication could not hide. As president, he reinstated Jim Crow in Washington, D.C., after the city had gone a long way toward ending it. But he did not limit himself to just the nation’s capital: He ordered the elimination of all senior positions in the federal government where Blacks supervised whites. One of the federal officials Wilson arranged to have fired was a Black customs inspector living out his last years in Beaufort, South Carolina: Robert Smalls.

As president, Wilson can rightfully be credited with a number of achievements. He was, in his day, and indeed even in the context of our times, a progressive. He was also a man born into a family that benefited from slave labor, whose theologian father preached that God commanded Black people to be slaves, and whose vast education never disabused him of the belief that Black people were his inferiors. That belief led him to visit incalculable pain and hardship on millions of people at home and abroad when, among other things, he had U.S. Marines occupy and establish a system of forced labor in Haiti that in effect reinstituted slavery in the very first Republic to have abolished it, back in 1803.

Smalls will never be as well-known as Wilson. In the hard calculus of affairs of state, perhaps Wilson counts more than Smalls. But on a human level, Smalls was a larger and better man than Wilson. We should be able to speak that plain fact without nostalgia, condescension, or defensiveness for the quite simple reason that the distance Wilson traveled from his privileged upbringing to the presidency of Princeton, to the governorship of New Jersey, and the presidency of the U.S. is objectively much shorter than that which Smalls traveled from being enslaved by his own father to fighting for the Union, to ratifying the Fourteenth Amendment, and representing the people of South Carolina in Congress.

In the end, it doesn’t matter terribly much whether Princeton removes Wilson’s name. He did destroy a generation of the Black middle class, and he did take away a freedom Haitians had fought a war of independence to earn. And yet, it should scarcely be surprising that an American university would choose to name a school of international affairs after one of its former presidents who, among other achievements, saw the country through World War I and was an intellectual architect of the precursor for the United Nations.

Wordorama

Smalls was 75 years old when Wilson, who probably never met the man and would have considered it beneath his dignity to be in the same room with him, reached down from the Oval Office and, with a small act that is not even granted a footnote in most surveys of Wilson’s legacy, capsized the last years of a Black man whose generation made America free. That’s as good a synopsis of the reality of white supremacy as one may get.

Wordorigins

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